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Find a muse, find a fuse

Who is your muse? Your mentor, confidant, teacher? Who do you look up to?

All questions we’ve been asked many times. Usually there is a simple answer like a celebrity or musician. I’ve had trouble identifying mine; but I’ve always been looking to the wrong stars. I see people go head over heels for their favorite singer or artist while I sit and wonder who mine is. I have always enjoyed Rihanna, but not all of her work. The same goes for Pink, Beyonce, MGMT, Foster the People, so on and so forth. Maybe I don’t have a favorite celebrity or artist. Could that be possible? Living in this world saturated with Entertainment news and socialites taking up the screens and leading the packs. It had never been a bummer to me, but the answer came while standing in the check-out aisle at Sprouts.

I solely walked into the store for three vegetables. After quickly gathering them I made my way to the front. Originally I began inspecting the organic chap-sticks and candies, but then my eyes fell on a black and white photo of Albert Einstein. His face intelligently looking at me with the background fading off into a deep black. There is always something mysterious about this man in every one of his pictures; seeing the TIME magazine stamp over the top set my hands in an inevitable motion for grabbing what I wanted. Though I only intended to purchase a cluster of garlic, a roma tomato, and small amount of basil; I instead bought the answer I couldn’t come up with when questioned. My muse, or favorite person, was far from mainstream media. They, as I quickly realized, are dead men.

 

Inspired by the stories they told the world, their legacies, and remaining alive to this day though inevitably buried six feet under. These men went about their business proving to themselves who they were, and in such, defining the impression they would make on the world.

Social media, let alone mainstream, focus on celebrities as gods. Everything about them is newsworthy. It’s no wonder people cling to these stories for inspiration, or simply something to talk about. Considering drama drives much of today’s social circles it isn’t such a crazy idea. However, there is something to be said about the men I admire. Their findings, work, and lives continue to have a direct effect on all those living today. I guess you could say my celebrities have drama of their own, like Steven Hawkings expanding on Einsteins findings, or Fitzgerald getting a remake of the Great Gatsby rather than a redo of Hemingway’s A Moveable feast. Tesla, I’m sure, is turning in his grave with all this “news” of electric cars being the future!

So my guys have their drama too. However it’s “nerdy” and requires more thought than speculating a dress on the red carpet. It might take watching Interstellar about twenty times before finally understanding the space-time continuum, and thus the great debate on what makes up our universe and the many theories trying to explain which has yet to be explained. As many continue to grovel at the feat of those celebrities who just so happen to be doing their job, at times, I will happily stand by the boys who have given me hope and inspiration through everything. Even when the hardest of problems were before me, I knew there was a way through it. Whether it be one true sentence, or one “simple” equation that would finally come after years of brooding over the obstacle. It is in this realization which sparked a fuse within me, encouraging my path forward. They are, after all, just a few of the people I look up to and respect. Thank you Gentlemen for being my muses.

And thank you for reading just another one of my rants!

Caleb A. Mertz

“You’re a Malaprop!”

I have distributed my latest novel to many different readers.  Some that I am very familiar with, and some that I hardly know.  While searching for a manuscript that had been distributed I ran into the young lady that was reading it for me.  “I told my husband,” She began, “that you’re just as bad a malaprop as he is!”  Then she laughed.

In the time of getting feedback on your novel there is no time for feelings to get involved or twisted into the work you have spent so many man hours over.  You have to accept the honesty of the reader to help make your work one that will resonate better with the masses that will hopefully be reading your story.

I was so embarrassed that I didn’t know what a malaprop was when I had to ask, “What’s that?”  It was one of those saddening feats where you feel that you will never be good enough.  This young lady is an avid reader, and a highly intellectual one at that.  She proceeded to tell me that she loved the work, but it had it’s errors.  I know it has errors it was only the second draft!  Why I decided to have readers look it over at only the second draft is beyond me….No it’s not.  I tend to think that my work is different.  My work doesn’t require an editor or some outside influence.  This sort of thinking may explain why my first two books were only published by Publish America.

Malapropism:

Luckily for me, being a malaprop isn’t so bad.  You just have to use a dictionary (much like any one else) in some very specific cases.  Oh and having an intelligent reader or editor is a great key to this as well.  None the less, I felt completely incompetent once I had come to understand the meaning of this word, and knowing that it pretty much meant you weren’t intelligent enough to tell the difference between two words.

Here’s to many other self realization facts in the near future!


(ˈmæləprɒpˌɪzəm) [Click for IPA pronunciation guide]
n
1. the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one of similar sound, esp when creating a ridiculous effect, as in I am not under the affluence of alcohol